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Dasan Builder's Blog

Latest Blog

  • The Consumer Product Safety Commission estimates that 724,000 people are injured in a ladder-related accident each year. That’s nearly 2,000 each day.

    More than 135,000 people are treated in emergency rooms for ladder-related injuries according to the National Safety Council.

    According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, ladder falls were responsible for 30 percent of disabling falls from height in the workplace in 2011.

    Multiple studies report that more than 330 people die each year from ladder accidents.

    As dangerous and deadly as working on a ladder can be, ladder safety is one of those things most people take for granted. When you have to clean out the gutters or cut high branches from trees on your property, just grab the nearest ladder and start climbing. When you’re at work and you have to inspect a roof or replace a window, just grab the nearest ladder.

    There’s more to ladder safety than knowing that you shouldn’t walk under one.  While that’s actually good advice, we need to get beyond old superstition and use ladders safely at home and on the job.

    The Occupational Health and Safety Association (OSHA) offers a comprehensive list of best practices for using portable ladders, which include step, straight, combination and extension ladders. Here are some simple do’s and don’ts that will help to keep you and others safe when using a ladder.

    The Do’s of Ladder Safety

    ·         Read labels and markings on the ladder and pay attention to what they say.

    ·         Inspect the ladder for damage before using it.

    ·         Watch for electrical hazards, like overhead power lines and exposed electrical equipment, and avoid using metal ladders in these cases.

    ·         Maintain a three-point contact on the ladder when climbing – two hands and a foot or two feet and a hand.

    ·         Keep your body in the middle of the rungs when climbing

    ·         Use ladders for what they were designed to do. Ladders aren’t scaffolds or platforms.

    ·         Place the ladder on a firm, flat surface.

    ·         The distance between the base of the ladder and the vertical surface should be one quarter of the working height of the ladder. For example, if you’re climbing onto a 12-foot roof, the base of the ladder should be three feet from the wall to create a safe support angle.

    ·         Secure, test and double check all locks on an extension ladder.

    The Don’ts of Ladder Safety

    ·         Don’t face away from the ladder when climbing down. It’s a ladder, not a staircase.

    ·         Don’t use a step ladder or folding ladder in a partially closed position to fit into a tight space.

    ·         Don’t stand on the top step or rung of a step ladder unless the label says this is safe. Most labels say that you shouldn’t stand on the top step or rung.

    ·         Don’t stand on the top three rungs of a straight, single or extension ladder when climbing onto a high surface. The ladder should extend three feet above the point of support.

    ·         Don’t place a ladder on top of another object, like a box, table or chair, as a way to reach a higher point.

    ·         Don’t move a ladder while someone or something is on it. Hopping while on a ladder can be deadly.

    ·         Don’t exceed a ladder’s maximum load rating. Consider not only the person climbing the ladder, but also any equipment that will be used on the ladder.

    Dasan Building Group has developed its own set of safety programs for a variety of tasks and equipment use. Our safety programs, including ladder safety, exceed industry standards to protect our employees, your tenants and your investment.

    If you use a ladder on the job and your employer doesn’t have a ladder safety program, or you plan to tackle home improvement projects that require a ladder, please follow these do’s and don’ts based on OSHA guidelines and stay safe!

  • Think about how a lower back injury can slow you down. It makes it difficult and uncomfortable to sleep, get up in the morning, get dressed, drive, do your job, play with your kids and get things done around the house.

    A lower back injury pretty much screws up your entire day. If it affects job performance, a lower back injury can also take money out of your pocket.

    According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, more than one million American workers injure their backs every year.  Four out of five of these injuries were to the lower back, and three out of four of these happened while lifting.

    We don’t know exactly what each of these people were trying to lift, or how heavy the loads were. We can say that most of those people most likely failed to use the most powerful muscle in the human body – the one between their ears.

    The most important thing you can do before a lift, whether you’re moving boxes in the garage or loading heavy equipment into a truck, is think. Think about how you can make the lift easier on your back.

    Remove obstacles in your path. If you’re lifting a container, make sure the weight is balanced and the contents are properly packed. Look for grips or handles. Determine whether or not you need gloves to prevent the load from slipping out of your hands and wrenching your back. Look for a dolly or hand truck to do the carrying for you.

    Give the object a little push with your feet to see how easy it is to move, or squat down and try to tilt it with your arms. This will help you assess the weight of the load if the weight isn’t known.

    There is no shame in asking for help if you think the load will be more than you can handle. A back belt will give you a little extra support, but it won’t necessarily prevent injury, so be careful.

    Once you’ve used the muscle between your ears, you’re ready to use the muscles in your legs, back, shoulders and arms. Use these safe lifting techniques to minimize the risk of injury.

    ·         Warm up, just like you would before a workout. Stretch out your back and legs for a few minutes.

    ·         Position your body close to the load and spread your feet wide apart to ensure balance and create a stable base.

    ·         Squat down, bending at the hips and knees instead of bending over at the waist.

    ·         Get a solid grip on the load before you try to lift it.

    ·         Use a smooth, fluid motion to gently lift the load instead of jerking and twisting. Keep your back straight and head up, tighten your abdominal muscles and lift with your legs until they’re straight.

    ·         If you need to carry the load, keep it close to your body to minimize stress on your back.

    ·         To put the object down, spread your feet and bend at the knees without bending over at the waist.

    ·         Use a step ladder to place the load above shoulder height. Otherwise, keep your feet apart with one in front of the other to create balance and support your back.

    Safe lifting is only possible if you use your head before and during the lift. If not, you risk serious and even permanent injury. Instead of trying to prove how strong you are, prove how smart you are.

  • Suppose you hire a contractor to replace the roof on your home or throughout your apartment complex. One of the roofers falls off the roof and breaks his leg, or a subcontractor hired to do some masonry work on the chimney drops a brick through your windshield.

    If the contractor is injured on your property, you’re injured as a direct result of work being done, or your property is damaged, who should pay for it? Is the contractor insured? Is any of this covered by your homeowner’s insurance?

    Welcome to your own liability nightmare.

    These types of liability issues are all too common, especially when homeowners and property managers hire contractors who don’t have liability insurance. These contractors usually offer the cheapest prices, but if something goes wrong, uninsured contractors create expensive legal headaches.

    One of the first questions you should ask a contractor when evaluating project bids is whether or not they’re insured. More than a financial or liability issue, it’s a safety issue.

    How carefully are you screening your contractors? Are you really willing to allow someone into your home or property without fully protecting the families who live there? Is the money you might be saving upfront worth that risk? If something goes wrong, are you prepared to pay a lawyer to resolve liability issues?

    When you hire a fully insured contractor like Dasan Building Group, you don’t have to worry about liability issues, you don’t have to worry about your family’s safety, and you don’t have to worry about what may or may not be covered by your homeowner’s insurance policy.

    A contractor’s insurance policy will generally cover:

    ·         Any accident that causes bodily injury to someone in your family or damage to your property.

    ·         Workman’s compensation for injuries to the contractor’s employees.

    ·         Accidents that involve the contractor’s equipment. This is why you don’t lend your own equipment to a contractor, whether it’s an extension cord, a ladder, a drill or a hammer. A contractor may claim that the equipment is faulty and make you pay for the resulting damage.

    Knowing that your contractor has insurance isn’t enough. Make sure you find out exactly what it covers. If it doesn’t cover subcontractors, ask for proof of their insurance as well.

    Hiring an uninsured contractor just isn’t worth the potential liability nightmare that you may have to endure if something goes wrong. Protect your family and your property by hiring a contractor who is fully insured.

Random Blog

  • Thursday, January 2, 2014 - 10:52

    Think about how a lower back injury can slow you down. It makes it difficult and uncomfortable to sleep, get up in the morning, get dressed, drive, do your job, play with your kids and get things done around the house.

    A lower back injury pretty much screws up your entire day. If it affects job performance, a lower back injury can also take money out of your pocket.

    According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, more than one million American workers injure their backs every year.  Four out of five of these injuries were to the lower back, and three out of four of these happened while lifting.

    We don’t know exactly what each of these people were trying to lift, or how heavy the loads were. We can say that most of those people most likely failed to use the most powerful muscle in the human body – the one between their ears.

    The most important thing you can do before a lift, whether you’re moving boxes in the garage or loading heavy equipment into a truck, is think. Think about how you can make the lift easier on your back.

    Remove obstacles in your path. If you’re lifting a container, make sure the weight is balanced and the contents are properly packed. Look for grips or handles. Determine whether or not you need gloves to prevent the load from slipping out of your hands and wrenching your back. Look for a dolly or hand truck to do the carrying for you.

    Give the object a little push with your feet to see how easy it is to move, or squat down and try to tilt it with your arms. This will help you assess the weight of the load if the weight isn’t known.

    There is no shame in asking for help if you think the load will be more than you can handle. A back belt will give you a little extra support, but it won’t necessarily prevent injury, so be careful.

    Once you’ve used the muscle between your ears, you’re ready to use the muscles in your legs, back, shoulders and arms. Use these safe lifting techniques to minimize the risk of injury.

    ·         Warm up, just like you would before a workout. Stretch out your back and legs for a few minutes.

    ·         Position your body close to the load and spread your feet wide apart to ensure balance and create a stable base.

    ·         Squat down, bending at the hips and knees instead of bending over at the waist.

    ·         Get a solid grip on the load before you try to lift it.

    ·         Use a smooth, fluid motion to gently lift the load instead of jerking and twisting. Keep your back straight and head up, tighten your abdominal muscles and lift with your legs until they’re straight.

    ·         If you need to carry the load, keep it close to your body to minimize stress on your back.

    ·         To put the object down, spread your feet and bend at the knees without bending over at the waist.

    ·         Use a step ladder to place the load above shoulder height. Otherwise, keep your feet apart with one in front of the other to create balance and support your back.

    Safe lifting is only possible if you use your head before and during the lift. If not, you risk serious and even permanent injury. Instead of trying to prove how strong you are, prove how smart you are.

  • Wednesday, January 1, 2014 - 10:53

    Suppose you hire a contractor to replace the roof on your home or throughout your apartment complex. One of the roofers falls off the roof and breaks his leg, or a subcontractor hired to do some masonry work on the chimney drops a brick through your windshield.

    If the contractor is injured on your property, you’re injured as a direct result of work being done, or your property is damaged, who should pay for it? Is the contractor insured? Is any of this covered by your homeowner’s insurance?

    Welcome to your own liability nightmare.

    These types of liability issues are all too common, especially when homeowners and property managers hire contractors who don’t have liability insurance. These contractors usually offer the cheapest prices, but if something goes wrong, uninsured contractors create expensive legal headaches.

    One of the first questions you should ask a contractor when evaluating project bids is whether or not they’re insured. More than a financial or liability issue, it’s a safety issue.

    How carefully are you screening your contractors? Are you really willing to allow someone into your home or property without fully protecting the families who live there? Is the money you might be saving upfront worth that risk? If something goes wrong, are you prepared to pay a lawyer to resolve liability issues?

    When you hire a fully insured contractor like Dasan Building Group, you don’t have to worry about liability issues, you don’t have to worry about your family’s safety, and you don’t have to worry about what may or may not be covered by your homeowner’s insurance policy.

    A contractor’s insurance policy will generally cover:

    ·         Any accident that causes bodily injury to someone in your family or damage to your property.

    ·         Workman’s compensation for injuries to the contractor’s employees.

    ·         Accidents that involve the contractor’s equipment. This is why you don’t lend your own equipment to a contractor, whether it’s an extension cord, a ladder, a drill or a hammer. A contractor may claim that the equipment is faulty and make you pay for the resulting damage.

    Knowing that your contractor has insurance isn’t enough. Make sure you find out exactly what it covers. If it doesn’t cover subcontractors, ask for proof of their insurance as well.

    Hiring an uninsured contractor just isn’t worth the potential liability nightmare that you may have to endure if something goes wrong. Protect your family and your property by hiring a contractor who is fully insured.

  • Sunday, January 5, 2014 - 10:54

    The Consumer Product Safety Commission estimates that 724,000 people are injured in a ladder-related accident each year. That’s nearly 2,000 each day.

    More than 135,000 people are treated in emergency rooms for ladder-related injuries according to the National Safety Council.

    According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, ladder falls were responsible for 30 percent of disabling falls from height in the workplace in 2011.

    Multiple studies report that more than 330 people die each year from ladder accidents.

    As dangerous and deadly as working on a ladder can be, ladder safety is one of those things most people take for granted. When you have to clean out the gutters or cut high branches from trees on your property, just grab the nearest ladder and start climbing. When you’re at work and you have to inspect a roof or replace a window, just grab the nearest ladder.

    There’s more to ladder safety than knowing that you shouldn’t walk under one.  While that’s actually good advice, we need to get beyond old superstition and use ladders safely at home and on the job.

    The Occupational Health and Safety Association (OSHA) offers a comprehensive list of best practices for using portable ladders, which include step, straight, combination and extension ladders. Here are some simple do’s and don’ts that will help to keep you and others safe when using a ladder.

    The Do’s of Ladder Safety

    ·         Read labels and markings on the ladder and pay attention to what they say.

    ·         Inspect the ladder for damage before using it.

    ·         Watch for electrical hazards, like overhead power lines and exposed electrical equipment, and avoid using metal ladders in these cases.

    ·         Maintain a three-point contact on the ladder when climbing – two hands and a foot or two feet and a hand.

    ·         Keep your body in the middle of the rungs when climbing

    ·         Use ladders for what they were designed to do. Ladders aren’t scaffolds or platforms.

    ·         Place the ladder on a firm, flat surface.

    ·         The distance between the base of the ladder and the vertical surface should be one quarter of the working height of the ladder. For example, if you’re climbing onto a 12-foot roof, the base of the ladder should be three feet from the wall to create a safe support angle.

    ·         Secure, test and double check all locks on an extension ladder.

    The Don’ts of Ladder Safety

    ·         Don’t face away from the ladder when climbing down. It’s a ladder, not a staircase.

    ·         Don’t use a step ladder or folding ladder in a partially closed position to fit into a tight space.

    ·         Don’t stand on the top step or rung of a step ladder unless the label says this is safe. Most labels say that you shouldn’t stand on the top step or rung.

    ·         Don’t stand on the top three rungs of a straight, single or extension ladder when climbing onto a high surface. The ladder should extend three feet above the point of support.

    ·         Don’t place a ladder on top of another object, like a box, table or chair, as a way to reach a higher point.

    ·         Don’t move a ladder while someone or something is on it. Hopping while on a ladder can be deadly.

    ·         Don’t exceed a ladder’s maximum load rating. Consider not only the person climbing the ladder, but also any equipment that will be used on the ladder.

    Dasan Building Group has developed its own set of safety programs for a variety of tasks and equipment use. Our safety programs, including ladder safety, exceed industry standards to protect our employees, your tenants and your investment.

    If you use a ladder on the job and your employer doesn’t have a ladder safety program, or you plan to tackle home improvement projects that require a ladder, please follow these do’s and don’ts based on OSHA guidelines and stay safe!